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The Power of Small: What We Can Learn from Express Credit Union

Elizabeth Escobar from Express Credit Union joins The Remarkable Credit Union podcast

In a movement where large asset sizes have become a badge of honor, Express Credit Union is proud to be small. They believe that their intimate size affords them the opportunity to truly know their members and to pivot quickly when faced with unexpected challenges.

This month, we’re excited to welcome Express Credit Union’s Chief Business Officer, Elizabeth Escobar, to talk about how to meet members where they’re at, what Express has to teach the country’s fourth largest credit union, and how to stay engaged with your members in the long-term.

She also addresses this month’s BIG question:

How can credit unions retain their people-to-people focus in a post-Covid era that relies on digital more than ever?

 

Takeaways

  1. Meet your members where they’re at — physically and digitally. I just love Express CU’s Community Teller program. We talk a lot at PixelSpoke about how good UX makes it easy, and the Community Teller program is a brilliant offline example of how to show up where prospective members already are and open an account for them onsite. In this day and age, most members use some digital tools, but they might differ depending on your membership. A one-size-fits-all digital approach might be asking your members to buy into technology they aren’t already using or may not trust: we have to meet people where they are and with the tools they want to use.
  1. Small and large credit unions both have a lot to offer one another. It’s so often assumed that large credit unions have more to teach or offer the movement, but in fact, relationships between small and large credit unions can be a two-way street. In the fascinating and unique relationship between Express and BECU, Express benefits from BECU’s “employee on loan” program, and BECU benefits by learning how to deliver in a more agile way, and by being able to refer members they can’t serve to another trusted local credit union.
  1. Cultivating ongoing relationships with your members over time is everything. Express CU invests a lot in connecting with its members, whether it’s a comprehensive survey to better understand their needs or a commitment to picking up the phone whenever a member calls. Express CU once facilitated a “unicorn tank” of ideas to better serve its members, and as Elizabeth says, “You don’t have to be all things to all people, but we do have to have an option for all things, even if it’s a referral elsewhere.” When this commitment to understanding and personal service results in engaged lifetime members, the benefits far outweigh the upfront costs.

 

Read the transcript:

Cameron Madill:
Hello and welcome to another episode of the Remarkable Credit Union Podcast. We created our podcast to help credit union leaders think outside of the box about marketing, technology, and community impact. The Remarkable Credit Union is brought to you by Pixelspoke, a digital marketing agency that works with credit unions to create user-friendly, high converting award-winning websites. As a B-Corp and worker-owned cooperative, we believe that business can and should be a force for good. Each episode we bring on expert guests from inside and outside of the industry for conversations about innovation. Our goal is to challenge your preconceptions about business as usual, and provide you with actionable takeaways that you can use to grow your membership, improve the financial health of your cooperative, and magnify the positive impact that you have in your community.

Today’s big question, how can credit unions retain their people to people focus in a post COVID era that relies on digital more than ever? I’m Cameron Madill, founder and the former CEO of Pixelspoke.

Kerala Taylor:
And I’m Kerala Taylor, a Pixelspoke co-owner and the senior manager of marketing. I’m so excited today to welcome Elizabeth Escobar from Express Credit Union. Elizabeth has over 12 years of community development finance experience, and before joining Express in 2011, she was a rural economic development volunteer for the US Peace Corps at a savings and lending cooperative in Paraguay. And now as chief business officer at Express, Elizabeth is charged with overseeing marketing activities and business development, cultivating relationships and connections. She embraces the CDFI mission, financial education, and collaborates closely with the CEO management team to develop overall strategy and annual business plans. In her free time Elizabeth enjoys snowboarding in the winter and giving back to the community when and where she can. She participates on the board of directors for a Latin run nonprofit in South Park, which is a neighborhood in Seattle that she also calls home. Elizabeth, thanks so much for joining us.

Elizabeth Escobar:
Thank you for having me.

Kerala Taylor:
Let’s just start with a little background around Express Credit Union. Can you just give us a brief history of your credit union and the community that you currently serve?

Elizabeth Escobar:
Yep, of course. And as every credit union story starts back in 1934, we were established as King Street Terminal Credit Union. We were initially serving Amtrak and Burlington Northern employees. Fast-forward to the early 2000s, I believe it was 2008, we were repurposed to have the mission that we currently have today of serving low-income communities. The Medina Foundation, a local Seattle Foundation, had been doing research around unbanked and underbanked communities in Washington state, and saw that a lot of people were using payday lenders and check cashing services. Instead of starting their own credit union, which is really expensive, they were connected with BECU, who then was connected with Express Credit Union, and the rest is history. We’ve embraced that new focus of being a low income designated credit union and serving underserved communities since that time.

We received our community development financial institution certification through the US Treasury back in 2010. And when we did that repurpose and changed our missions to really focusing on serving underserved communities, we also increased our focus on collaborating with community. And at that time, we also started accepting the individual tax ID number or ITIN for all accounts and loans. 2008 was a really big year for us. Switching missions, 2010 getting CDFI. And since then, serving the CDFI mission is our pure focus. The programs have really grown and currently, 46% of our lending portfolio is to that ITIN population. And because of that success and language demand from our members, our entire member facing staff is now bilingual English and Spanish, and is actually a requirement for those positions, and most of our collateral is also in Spanish. I would say we’ve evolved over time, but have dove in headfirst really to serving the CDFI mission.

Kerala Taylor:
Absolutely. We’ve talked quite a bit on this podcast about CDFIs, and it sounds like that certification process, unsurprisingly, can be a bit of a doozy, but that it’s well worth it and opens up a lot of new opportunities. I love that your mission statement includes not just serving your community, but collaborating with your community. And one thing you do that really caught my attention, is deploying what you call community tellers at your partner organizations. Can you tell us a bit about just how this program works and what its aims are?

Elizabeth Escobar:
Yeah, of course. It’s a really fun program and it’s a model that’s evolved over time since we launched it in 2008. Really now, any staff who goes to a community partner location and sets up one of our pop-up sites, is considered a community teller as their secondary title while they’re at that site. Myself included, there’s a team of three of us, we go to where the people are, and we don’t wait for them to come to us. The team is my coworker, Cynthia, who’s our business development specialist, and Arturo, who is our traveling community teller.

And so, we go physically to the partner location, typically their office where they see clients, and we set up a station, set up a table with resources. We offer financial education, one-on-one coaching, account opening services, and we help people complete loan applications. With the laptop and secure wifi, we can help an individual establish that account while we’re at the partner location, so they don’t have to go online or come into our office.

Many times clients are receiving other services while they’re at that partner location, so it’s a one-stop shop for the person making the visit. And we also really collaborate with the partner staff while we’re onsite at those locations, to inform and educate them around express services, financial education, and how to make referrals to us when we’re not on site. We really value spending time at our partner locations because it’s really staying true to that mission and continuing to serve those furthest from opportunity. Being a person is what builds relationships, builds trust in community, and we’ve just swung so far to everything digital all the time, that, that gets lost. And so, we do really make an emphasis on continuing the Community Teller Program.

Cameron Madill:
Well Elizabeth, that’s a great segue into, as you said, the pendulum between digital and human. One of the things we talked about a lot is the human plus digital approach. Obviously, we build websites for credit unions. We’re big believers in the power of technology to improve access to financial services and create great experiences, but we’ve also seen that it can lose sight of what it is that really makes credit unions and really most smaller businesses special, is that human touch, and that technology is a tool or an accelerator. Unless your end mission is to be a digital only credit union, it’s not the end goal just being technology. We’ve got this people helping people philosophy that’s central to the credit union move in, it’s built into your mission and who you are. How do you guys think about that balance between the human in-person component and the digital tools and what they can facilitate?

Elizabeth Escobar:
We’re strong believers of the human touch here, but we do think technology can level the playing field for organizations. Regardless of their size, technology can put us on an equal playing field from a business standpoint. But I personally think meeting people where they’re at with technology and the methods they prefer, is what’s most important. We have to evolve and keep up with technology, not only to stay relevant but competitive, but we also have to listen to our members and reach them the way they want. With our unique mission and many members that come to us, we see that they actually have a lot of mistrust with technology. That’s one of the reasons they might have been pushed out of mainstream financial services because they’re forced to use that technology or talk to people that don’t really care or understand their unique situation.

I think one of the benefits of being a relatively small credit union, is we have the privilege and the ability to keep that personal touch. We still know our members’ names, we know their stories, we know their voices. Most members do have smartphones and email, so we can use those tools to make a process more efficient, if that’s the way they want. We also use text messaging as an option for people who prefer not to use email.

Still having the phone call to talk through the why something was done or to ease a concern, rather than pointing them to an FAQ online or a chatbot to answer a question, is really important to us at Express. We find that people still value being able to get through and talk to a real person. Although we understand it’s not the most cost-effective way of doing business, but that again, is what the CDFI funding helps us with, is keeping staff and keeping that personal touch. Some of our members do require a few more conversations to do something that might just take one conversation with a more affluent person.

And then also, as it relates to our Hispanic membership, we know they like to come in person with their families to talk to us. They like the traditional building trust building relationships. And since we have a team that speak that language and understand their lived experiences, they feel comfortable coming into us. Rather than completing the account opening or loan closing remotely as they could if they wanted to, we embrace that they like to come in with the family and we’ve created a space for them to feel welcome and part of the family here when they do come in person. It’s a mix of technology and in-person, but pretty heavy on the in-person personal touch here at Express.

Cameron Madill:
Great. I love those thoughts and I think, well first of all, for our audience, this is Elizabeth’s first podcast ever, and you’re doing amazing. I don’t know if this is normal, but you’re doing amazing. And one warning, not all podcasts are like this one where I ask “questions” and I just ramble all over the place. I’m going to try to land the plane on this, Elizabeth, because you said so much that was exciting.

One, right? Yeah, the phone is not the most cost-effective method, but hemorrhaging members is not the most cost-effective way to do business either, right? There’s always that trade off of if we’re looking over the value of a 30 or 40 year relationship, you can spend more money on things and obviously, you have grants to support that too. And another thing that was interesting was we had a client telling us recently that because of the huge surge in fraud, that their somewhat antiquated or at least somewhat primitive phone banking system has tripled in popularity. I think it was an interesting reminder too, that I love what you said about basically having lots of different tools and being able to use the right tool for the right situation. I think we can lose sight of that when we say, “What is the purely most cost-effective on a per transaction basis?” Because we lose sight of things like lifetime member value and trust.

Okay, so that was really long. Now to my next question. Thank you, Elizabeth for all the inspiring thoughts. Another thing I love about the way you approach your members, as you said, you’re small, a team of 15, and you seem like you’re really able to escape some of the boxes that financial institutions are put in because there is a lot of expectation that people just assume every credit union can do all these different things. You guys seem like you’re able to be a little bit more intentional about what is our product mix that’s going to really meet our members’ needs, versus there’s just so many products that credit unions are expected to have. And so I’m curious with that more nimble size and maybe a slightly tighter focus on a certain member demographic, how do you evaluate those different products and get feedback from your members to make sure you have that Goldilocks mix of not too much and not too few?

Elizabeth Escobar:
This is a great question because it’s something that I personally have to manage every day. I always have ideas, and new products, and services, and why don’t we do this and do that, but then back to reality, what’s the capacity that we actually have? And in a class that I am attending currently, one of the professors was saying, “You can’t be everything for everyone and you need to find your focus and your niche because we just can’t do everything for everyone.”

And when I think about Express Credit Union though and our mission, our members are here because a lot of times they don’t have another place to go. And so we do have to be everything for them and if we can’t offer it, we have to make sure we have a really good referral source or a partner that we can refer them to. We are still struggling with this and trying not to do everything for everyone and spread ourselves too thin, but it is a challenge. And so in our 2022 strategic planning session, it was determined by our board and management team that it was a good time to better understand our members after the shock of the pandemic, and ensure that we have the right services to fit their needs and to fill any gaps.

We did hire a firm to help conduct a large member research study to understand how our members describe their process of choosing a financial institution, their motivations and priorities that lead them to choose who they use as their primary financial institution, and as every financial institution does, we need deposits and we want our members to use this as their preferred FI because we believe our products and services are great, but we needed to ask them and ensure this is right. We wanted to understand what factors influence their financial journeys and how they describe their financial needs and aspirations. Through qualitative and quantitative research, we studied our members and community partners to explore their perceptions, motivations and expectations regarding their banking experiences and financial goals.

That was all done in early 2023 and just a month or so ago, we got the final report with recommendations and findings. We’ve used that report in our business planning process to integrate some of these recommendations and findings. One of them was to implement an ongoing evaluation system and program to continue to collect the feedbacks and feelings towards Express to better inform these decisions moving forward because now we do have a baseline of how our members feel and to continue tracking that, but making sure that we’re tracking the engagement level and not just the satisfaction level.

Through that also, we’ve identified some gaps and enhancements we can make in our products and are actually doing a really fun team project. I set four teams of three staff and they have been tasked with, it’s called the Unicorn Tank, and they’ve been tasked with coming up with a product service enhancement, just something based on the feedback. We had our staff read all of the surveys that our members submitted so they could see firsthand what our members were saying and it wasn’t just management seeing this and reading these reports, but it was our staff who are answering the phones, who are at the teller line, seeing this firsthand and coming up with solutions together.

At our November staff meeting, they’ll be pitching their ideas and we’ll be judging, and I’m excited to see what they’ve come up with. I’ve heard great feedback. They’re really engaged in this process and feel valued that they’ve been asked to help participate.

Cameron Madill:
The Unicorn Tank sounds amazing. Is this an aquarium, or a military tank, or something else? Just the visual is…

Elizabeth Escobar:
Oh, like Shark Tank, but Unicorn.

Cameron Madill:
Shark, okay got it.

Kerala Taylor:
Oh, I get it. I get it.

Elizabeth Escobar:
I feel like a unicorn should be our mascot.

Kerala Taylor:
Yeah.

Cameron Madill:
We support that.

Kerala Taylor:
I love what you said too about measuring engagement, not just satisfaction. It seems like a lot of companies want to know, “Hey, what do you think about us?” Which is valuable information for any company, but also really measuring the true level to which they’re engaged is so important. It sounds like a really interesting and informative process.

Elizabeth, we met at the GoWest MAXX Conference back in October, and I admit I have a soft spot for small credit unions. You never judge a credit union based on its asset size. They all have valuable perspectives to contribute. One session I attended that I just really loved was about a collaborative partnership between the CEO of a two plus billion dollars credit union and the CEO of a $40 million credit union. The gist was that smaller credit unions actually have a lot to teach larger credit unions. It’s not just the other way around. I’m just curious what insights you feel Express has to offer to large credit unions, and how do you think maybe they can do a better job of maintaining that people to people focus so central to your mission?

Elizabeth Escobar:
Yeah, so this is actually a really fun question, and I think that large credit unions can learn a lot from smaller credit unions. There’s a lot of pros and cons to each size of each organization, and I’m of course biased to the smaller ones. I really enjoy how the staff and employees of smaller credit unions are able to learn the ins and outs of how a credit union is run, managed, and can get experience in so many different departments. At our credit union, our frontline tellers have so many opportunities to collaborate directly with our CEO, and luckily we have a great culture of collaboration, honesty, and empathy within our team, making it a really fun place to work. We’ve had a few team members who’ve needed to leave for different reasons, who have actually come back a year or more later wanting to work with us again, and we’ve rehired them. Obviously, the ability for a small credit union staff to connect to the mission and feel that they truly make an impact also helps keep that people to people focus.

In regards to partnering with larger credit unions, I’m also biased to larger credit unions because we also have a very unique relationship with a $30 billion credit union. Since 2008 when we took on our new mission, we’ve been cultivating and creating a stronger relationship with BECU. In 2017, we launched the Bridge Program, which is a member referral program, where denied members of BECU are referred to Express. We actually have an office located in their Tukwila branch, along with my coworker Arturo, who’s our traveling community teller, who visits a lot of the other BECU neighborhood financial centers, meeting with their staff, talking about the referral program in building their relationships.

We’ve also launched a program called Employee on Loan, where a BECU executive comes to work at Express for a period of time, to help us with larger projects or areas we don’t have a lot of expertise in. We’re wrapping up the second year of our current employee on loan, and we’ve also partnered with them on sale and service training, along with coaching training for our management team. Our management team meets in virtual meeting rooms and there’s role play and different sessions, and it helps us, the managers learn and see different styles and are able to access those training opportunities that we don’t have ourselves with only 15 staff.

BECU also, and their staff get a really valuable experience, working with our team and taking back to their roles at BECU. They’ve been able to learn how to deliver quicker and smaller chunks through this partnership. We’ve piloted a few services or vendor relationships to prove concept. I think there’s a lot of other ways larger credit unions could partner with smaller credit unions, maybe collaborating on a certain niche together, and target market outside of their traditional membership, and help make more of an impact on maybe a specific demographic or location. Maybe there’s a banking desert where a small credit union and large credit union could come together to share resources and provide access in an area where that niche market is allowing their staff to engage with members, volunteers, and community boards also I think is really important, where maybe staff of a larger credit union could be on a board of a smaller credit union or vice versa. I could talk for days about the collaboration and the relationship, but I did want to share that with you.

Kerala Taylor:
That is so fascinating. You should definitely have a session at the next GoWest MAXX Conference. I’d love to learn more about it.

Cameron Madill:
Yeah, I think I’d like to get loaned out. That sounds fun. Yeah, what a cool program, Elizabeth. I’m curious, we’ve talked already about just how important the face-to-face component is, and I’m curious how you guys manage that. Seattle, like Portland, we were to put it lightly, very rigorous in our lockdowns. Huge restrictions. How do you go and you almost have your business model ripped away from you in a situation like that, about maintaining those ties while also still respecting local health codes and public health and public safety? Just curious how you adapted and was there anything that you started doing differently as a result of that, that carried forward in your business practices?

Elizabeth Escobar:
Yeah. Well, having only one branch was very interesting. We had to stay open. We never shut our doors. We don’t have a drive-through, and only having one branch forced us to stay open. We were essential business. Our members needed us, so we had to find a way. Luckily, but sadly, we work in the city and area with more crime, so we have always had a bulletproof partition at our teller line in our lobby. We had the glass barrier between our members and our staff. Masks required, the barriers there, tried to limit numbers of people in the lobby, but a lot of people weren’t coming out, so it wasn’t the biggest of deals.

Instead of meeting face-to-face in a meeting room, we would meet at the lobby for accounts and loan closing. Many shared branch locations closed, making it more difficult for our members because they had less locations to go to. We rely heavily on that network, having one location, so they were forced to use more technology at times, which is okay, but they did come in a lot more. And luckily, we do have that community teller model set up already, so we have the technology in place, and it was really easy for our teams to switch to a remote work and have more flexible schedules during that time. We switched to two teams, one team in the office for a week while the other team worked from home for a week. And then we would switch just because, again, our small size. We needed to make sure we always had people.

And now, we have all our staff able to work remote when they need to, although most still do choose to come into the office because they prefer to work together. It’s helped us keep staff engaged and excited to work with that increased flexibility. Although in our policy, it says work from home is not to be used to take care of children. If you have a doctor’s appointment or something comes up, you can just work from home in the morning and after. But yeah, they prefer working here. But with the flexibility, it’s really nice for our team.

We actually grew 20% in 2020, and our team actually got through two years without infection. I’m pretty proud of ourselves.

Kerala Taylor:
Wow.

Elizabeth Escobar:
Yeah, I was proud we were able to stay open. We were able to continue to provide that in-person service, and it paid off. We did stop a lot of the partner pop ins. It took a long time for our partners to reopen, a long time for a lot of those social service agents to reopen, which actually surprised me. But we’re just now at the levels we were again, pre- pandemic, with those popups in the community teller visits.

Cameron Madill:
Well, it sounds like, and maybe in summary, just greater flexibility around work from home and letting people use the right tool for the right job.

Elizabeth Escobar:
Yeah.

Cameron Madill:
I agree. It’s so nice. It’s like how am I supposed to take care of the rest of my life when everything else is only open when I’m supposed to be at work?

Kerala Taylor:
It’s been a question of mine for ages.

Cameron Madill:
Yeah. All right. Well, Elizabeth, thank you for being so deep, and thoughtful, and mindful, and intentional. Let’s go the complete opposite direction and let’s do some rapid fire questions. Let’s just shoot from the hip. Deep question first. What’s your life slogan?

Elizabeth Escobar:
Carpe diem.

Cameron Madill:
Carpe diem. I love it. What is a place you’d like to visit that you’ve never visited?

Elizabeth Escobar:
Thailand.

Cameron Madill:
Thailand. Excellent. What is a song that you’re just incredibly embarrassed to admit to our audience that you’re completely in love with?

Elizabeth Escobar:
I think Britney Spears, Toxic.

Cameron Madill:
Well played. Well played. All right, fully earned. And what is your favorite word? If you had to have a word tattooed onto your forehead backwards, so you could read it in the mirror for the rest of your life-

Elizabeth Escobar:
Oh my gosh.

Cameron Madill:
Yeah. We’re raising the bar. What would that word be?

Elizabeth Escobar:
Community.

Cameron Madill:
Community.

Elizabeth Escobar:
No. I was going to say… I was going to say this word is called [inaudible 00:26:19], it’s a Guarani word, and it just sounds cool, but it means therefore. I wouldn’t tattoo therefore on my forehead, but it…

Cameron Madill:
Well, this is important. For audiences, you’ve heard, Elizabeth lived in Paraguay, your husband is Paraguay, correct?

Elizabeth Escobar:
Yes.

Cameron Madill:
And Paraguay is really interesting that it’s, I believe the only country in Latin America where there’s a second major or fully national language. Did I get that correct?

Elizabeth Escobar:
Yes.

Cameron Madill:
Let’s say the Guarani word again so we can all become more cultured on this podcast. What’s the word again?

Elizabeth Escobar:
[inaudible 00:26:51].

Cameron Madill:
[inaudible 00:26:52], and it means therefore?

Elizabeth Escobar:
Yeah.

Cameron Madill:
All right. I’m just going to casually work that into my next conversation. All right. Back to you, Kerala. Thanks, Elizabeth.

Kerala Taylor:
And I will fully admit to rocking out to some Britney Spears over the weekend. I’ve been hearing about her memoir and I was like, “You know what? I came of age with Britney Spears and I actually really like some of those songs.”

Elizabeth Escobar:
Yes.

Kerala Taylor:
Let’s do our final take. Just as a reminder to our listeners, our big question today was how can credit unions retain their people to people focus in a post COVID era that relies on digital more than ever? I’m just wondering, we’ve been talking for quite a while now, but can you just summarize your thoughts to this big question in a few sentences?

Elizabeth Escobar:
Yeah, of course. I think meeting people where they’re at, understanding what their needs are and how they prefer to be communicated with is really important. Yes, we’re businesses, we need to be efficient, we need to be profitable, but our members are our business. And if we aren’t serving them the way they would like, then we’ll lose their business. I think just always having that human touch, and staying connected to community, and staying up to date on what’s important to them, what their concerns are because we’re in a position to respond and help them. Money is foundational. I heard this recently. Money is the longest relationship you’ll ever have, and it is really important to cultivate that relationship, to nurture that. We are the ones helping our members nurture their relationships with money. Being flexible, it’s important. Not staying inside a box and saying, “This is why I can do it and why I can’t do it,” but how can we flex and how can we think about things differently, I think is really important.

Kerala Taylor:
I love it. Well, thank you so much for joining us today, Elizabeth.

Elizabeth Escobar:
Thank you for inviting me. It was a pleasure.

Kerala Taylor:
All right, folks, it’s time for our three key takeaways. One thing that really resonated with me was this idea of meeting your members where they’re at, both physically and digitally. I just have to say, I love Express Credit Union’s Community Teller Program. We talk a lot at Pixelspoke about how good UX makes it easy, and the community teller program is just a brilliant offline example of how to show up where prospective members already are and actually open an account for them on site. In this day and age, most members use some digital tools, but they just might differ depending on your membership and a one size fits all digital approach, it just might be asking your members to buy into technology they aren’t already using or may not trust. We have to meet people where they are and with the tools they want to use.

Another thing that stood out to me was how much both small and large credit unions have to offer one another. I think it’s so often assumed that large credit unions have more to teach or offer the movement, but in fact, relationships between small and large credit unions can be a two-way street. The fascinating and unique relationship between Express and BECU proves this, how Express benefits from the BECU employee loans and BECU benefits, by learning how to deliver in a more agile way, and also by being able to refer members they can’t serve to another trusted local credit union.

And we’ve certainly talked about this before on this podcast, but it bears repeating over and over. Cultivating ongoing relationships with your members over time is everything and Express Credit Union really understands this. They invest a lot in connecting with their members, whether that’s a comprehensive survey to better understand their needs or a commitment to just picking up the phone whenever a member calls. I love the Unicorn Tank of ideas to better serve members and I loved how Elizabeth said, “You don’t have to be all things to all people, but we do have to have an option for all things, even if it’s a referral elsewhere.” When this commitment to understanding and personal service results and engaged lifetime members, the benefits just far outweigh the upfront costs.

Well, thanks for joining us today for another great episode. The Remarkable Credit Union is brought to you by Pixelspoke, a digital marketing agency that works with credit unions to create user-friendly, high converting award-winning websites. As a B-Corp and employee-owned cooperative, we believe that businesses can and should be a force for good. You can learn more and check out our work at Pixelspoke.coop. That’s Pixelspoke, all one word, dot C-O-O-P. Until the next time, I wish you the best of luck in making your credit union remarkable.

 

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